Catholic Culture Solidarity
Catholic Culture Solidarity

Highlight clips from the Catholic Culture Podcast

These engaging and informative clips on our YouTube channel, taken from longer episodes, provide a wonderful introduction to Catholic Culture’s podcasting program:

Why artists loved to paint St. Anthony's demonic encounters w/ Elizabeth Lev [7:32]
Art historian Elizabeth Lev explains the historical importance of St. Anthony of the Desert and why he became so popular in religious art, especially in outlandish scenes portraying his conflicts with demons in animal form. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 91—The Temptation of St. Anthony—Elizabeth Lev.

Pope Leo XIII: Absolute free speech is bad, actually [11:33]
Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 90—Leo XIII on the State’s Duties Toward the Church—Thomas Pink.

Highlights: Garrigou-Lagrange, Dana Gioia, Tolkien’s metaphysics, and more [1:30:20]
This is an episode-length compilation of highlights from old episodes of the Catholic Culture Podcast: on the great theologian Garrigou-Lagrange, abortion colonialism in Africa, Tolkien's metaphysics, and interviews with Catholic poet Dana Gioia and sacred music composer Paul Jernberg.

Highlights: How men can help the angry feminist in their lives, and more [1:04:38]
This is an episode-length compilation of highlights from old episodes of the Catholic Culture Podcast: on how men can respond to feminism, a new translation of the Gospel of Mark, moral blindness and abortion, and the sculptor whose bust of Pope Benedict XVI received an award from that very Pope.

Highlights: Feminism and ideology; intuition, temperance and art; Great Books; Tolkien’s visual art [57:20]
This is an episode-length compilation of highlights from old episodes of the Catholic Culture Podcast: on feminism and ideology, Maritain's philosophy of poetry; the arts, contemplation and virtue; studying the Great Books online; and Tolkien's visual art.

Podcast Highlights: The abuse crisis, acedia and more [1:03:37]
This is an episode-length compilation of highlights from old episodes of the Catholic Culture Podcast: from one of the most popular episodes ever, on acedia, the forgotten capital sin; Fr. Roger Langry on how the laity must respond to the abuse crisis; an interview with one of the writers of a film about mass abortion murderer Kermit Gosnell; and a piece of music by a capella group VOCES8.

Highlights: Music and morals, Tolkien and more [1:13:16]
This is an episode-length compilation of highlights from old episodes of the Catholic Culture Podcast: on music and morals with Basil Cole, O.P.; on being a priest and actor with George Drance, S.J.; a civics lesson for Catholics with Bob Marshall; and clips from two interviews with Corey Olsen, the Tolkien Professor.

Podcast Highlights: Native saints, Operation Rescue and more [1:29:41]
This is an episode-length compilation of highlights from old episodes from the Catholic Culture Podcast, on the topics of Native American saints, the pro-life civil disobedience movement, and Mary; plus clips from interviews with a Catholic actor, a musician, and CatholicCulture.org founder Jeff Mirus.

Was Karl Marx a Satanist? w/ Paul Kengor [13:12]
Paul Kengor, author of The Devil and Karl Marx, goes over some of the evidence (in biographies published by mainstream and academic presses) that Marx may have been a Satanist, including his valorization of the demonic in his own writings, his obsession with the Faustian bargain, his friends and family's description of him as a demonic figure, and more. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 86—Karl Marx, “Monster of Ten Thousand Devils”—Paul Kengor.

Marx's Family Life —Why Philosophers' Moral Lives Matter w/ Paul Kengor [14:51]
Paul Kengor, author of The Devil and Karl Marx, details Karl Marx's wretched family life, his willful refusal to support his wife and children and his hypocritical selfishness about money. Then he and Thomas discuss the relevance of the personal lives of philosophers in evaluating their thought, arguing that the modern separation of moral and intellectual life is fraudulent. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 86—Karl Marx, “Monster of Ten Thousand Devils”—Paul Kengor.

Comedy Humbles the Proud w/ Jeremy McLellan [9:51]
Catholic comedian Jeremy McLellan discusses the social role of comedy in taking people outside their comfort zone and humbling the proud, but also the limits of comedy. Comedians are often contrarians without a positive vision of reality to replace what they’re critiquing, and the result can be nihilistic (even if, at times, pleasantly anti-woke). Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 87—The Jester Is Not The King—Jeremy McLellan.

Uncomfortable Jokes and Endless Euphemisms w/ Jeremy McLellan [14:23]
Catholic comedian Jeremy McLellan recounts the funniest joke he ever heard, which was told by a guy with Down’s Syndrome. Then, reflecting on his experience working with people with mental disabilities, he suggests that one reason for the endlessly changing euphemisms for disabilities is not so much a desire to be inclusive, but discomfort with the very existence of disability and the disabled. So long as disabled people are not included in mainstream society, but segregated and shunted off, we will attempt to put a band-aid on the problem by coming up new, ever-more-sensitive terms for THEM. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 87—The Jester Is Not The King—Jeremy McLellan.

Early pagan and Jewish attacks on Mary w/ Mike Aquilina [4:56]
An examination of how the pagans and Jews attacked the mother of Christ from the first. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 89—Mary and the Blues—Mike Aquilina.

Early belief in Mary’s Assumption w/ Mike Aquilina [7:41]
A look at how the first Christians regarded the Assumption of the Blessed VIrgin. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 89—Mary and the Blues—Mike Aquilina.

What was the agape meal and why did it disappear? w/ Mike Aquilina [5:02]
Mike Aquilina explains two early Christian religious practices involving food, both of which disappeared in the early centuries of the Church: the agape meal and the refrigerium. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 89—Mary and the Blues—Mike Aquilina.

Leo XIII, Vatican II and Religious Liberty—Continuity or Contradiction? [19:14]
Prof. Thomas Pink discusses the relationship between Vatican II’s declaration on religious liberty (Dignitatis Humanae) and the prior teachings of Pope Leo XIII and other popes on the relationship between Church and State. Are they actually or only seemingly contradictory? The decree manages to be consistent with prior teaching by confining itself to statements about the civil order—that is, the authority that the State, in itself, possesses over religion, which is nil. In this way, Dignitatis Humanae is ironically a Leonine document insofar as its treatment of the civil order is drawn from his distinction between the two powers. At the same time, however, it dodges the whole question of legitimate religious coercion (of heretics, etc.) by the State not of its own authority but when acting as agent of the Church. This is how the progressive party at the Council influenced the document—not by getting it to contradict past teachings, but by preventing it from specifically enumerating those teachings. As a result, even most conservative Catholics today are either unaware of or uncomfortable with the traditional teachings on Church and State. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 90—Leo XIII on the State’s Duties Toward the Church—Thomas Pink.

Two Coercive Powers: Church and State w/ Thomas Pink [5:34]
Discussion of the coercive authority of both Church and State. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 90—Leo XIII on the State’s Duties Toward the Church—Thomas Pink.

Leo XIII: States must profess the true religion [8:09]
A discussion of the religious obligations of the State, with Thomas Pink. Clip from the Catholic Culture Podcast, episode 90—Leo XIII on the State’s Duties Toward the Church—Thomas Pink.