Catholic Culture Podcasts
Catholic Culture Podcasts

Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet—St. Joseph: A Man after God’s Own Heart

By James T. Majewski ( bio - articles - email ) | Mar 19, 2021 | In Catholic Culture Audiobooks (Podcast)

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Preview: “Joseph merited the greatest honors because he was never touched by honor. The Church has nothing more illustrious, because it has nothing more hidden.”

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James T. Majewski is Director of Customer Relations for CatholicCulture.org, the host and “voice” of Catholic Culture Audiobooks, and co-host of Criteria: The Catholic Film Podcast. A film and voice actor based in New York City, he holds a BA in Philosophy and an MFA in Acting. See full bio.

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  • Posted by: James T. Majewski - Mar. 22, 2021 9:49 AM ET USA

    I'll have to look into that text, Randal -- thanks for the tip!

  • Posted by: Randal Mandock - Mar. 19, 2021 10:02 PM ET USA

    I have an excellent book that I believe is part of Bossuet's "Discourse on Universal History". The book is called "The Continuity of Religion". Filled with subtle humor, it can definitely keep an informed Catholic's attention. I tried using it as a textbook for an 8th-grade CCD course that I gave the same title. Unfortunately, it is too deep for modern 8th graders. What I like about Bossuet's approach is that it is Catholic. By this I mean more concerned with message than with literary criticism