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Dublin's Archbishop Martin calls for calm, respectful debate on same-sex marriage

March 20, 2015

Archbishop Diarmuid Martin of Dublin called for a calm and respectful discussion before a referendum vote on same-sex marriage, and defended the Church’s traditional teaching on marriage and family life, in a March 19 address.

“In the current debate, normal parliamentary procedures seem rushed,” the archbishop complained. He also expressed concern about efforts to silence opponents of same-sex marriage, and threats to ignore the conscience rights of those who could not in principle recognize same-sex unions.

Archbishop Martin said that there is something "irreplaceable in that relationship between a man and a woman who commit to one another in love and who remain open to the transmission and the nurturing of human life." He observed, too, that every human being is the product of male-female reproduction. “Even if it were possible to clone a child, that child would still bear the genetic imprint of a male and a female,” he said.

The archbishop criticized some of the opponents of same-sex marriage, too, telling the Dublin audience that he had received messages that were “not just intemperate but obnoxious, insulting and unchristian.”

 


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  • Posted by: Thomas429 - Mar. 20, 2015 11:48 PM ET USA

    How charitable was Jesus with people who continued to live in their sin? I remember his statement to his disciples regarding town(s) where they were not accepted. Shake the dust from these towns from your sandals. It will be as bad for them as it was for those in Sodom and Gomorrah! That does not sound particularly tolerant or Christian in the way those words are used today.