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Vatican News highlights cardinal’s opposition to US bishops’ document on Eucharist

November 15, 2021

» Continue to this story on Vatican News

CWN Editor's Note: The Vatican News service has posted an interview with retired Cardinal Roger Mahony, giving prominent coverage to the cardinal’s view that a document on “Eucharistic coherence,” which will be discussed at this week’s meeting of the American hierarchy, is “totally unnecessary.”

Invoking the familiar argument about separation of Church and state, Cardinal Mahony argues that it is “almost impossible” for a Catholic politician to make decisions consistently based on Church doctrine. He praises a June statement issued by 60 Democratic representatives, saying that when he read it, “I said, ‘This is us! This is the Church!’” In that statement the lawmakers had objected to “the weaponization of the Eucharist to Democratic lawmakers for their support of a woman’s safe and legal access to abortion.”

Cardinal Mahony’s arguments are not original or surprising. But it is noteworthy that the Vatican’s official service chose to call attention to these views—expressed by a prelate who resigned under pressure ten years ago—on the eve of the US bishops’ debate.

The above note supplements, highlights, or corrects details in the original source (link above). About CWN news coverage.

 


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Show 2 Comments? (Hidden)Hide Comments
  • Posted by: DrRich - Nov. 17, 2021 12:19 AM ET USA

    No your Eminence, the last Motu Proprio was totally unnecessary

  • Posted by: miketimmer499385 - Nov. 15, 2021 5:14 PM ET USA

    Politicians can choose to be Catholic or they can choose to be in another line of work. Whichever, they can refrain from spouting heretical dogma as if they have been ordained and become moral theologians. We are slowly but surely discovering which bishops and priests should never have been ordained in our Church.