spliced

By Diogenes (articles | Jun 15, 2008

The UK media are reporting that two gay priests (Anglican) were married last month in England, provoking the predictable journalistic flutter, and a call from the African episcopacy that the Archbishop of Canterbury take steps. As with the last dozen final and fatal wounds to the Anglican communion, the present stunt is surprising only for its tardiness, and the senior churchmen asked to comment are clearly annoyed at being distracted from the cricket match with New Zealand in order to come up with a plausible formula of anxiety (this just in: they're viewing the development with concern, and England are 304 for 4).

The controverted ceremony itself was a Monty Python riff on Archbishop Cranmer. If you think about it, it could hardly be anything else.

Mr Dudley opened the service by saying: "Dearly beloved, we are gathered together here in the sight of God to join these men in a holy covenant of love and fidelity. Such a covenant shows us the mystery of the union between God and God's people and between Christ and the Church."

So, in this "mystery," does the man represent Christ while the man takes the place of the Church -- or is it the other way around?

Richard Cross holds a doctorate in psychology, who has taught at the university level, including at Franciscan University. He is currently an educational researcher and consultant in the field of psychology and related disciplines.
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