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Ordinary Time: June 10th

Memorial of Mary, Mother of Church; Monday of the Tenth Week of Ordinary Time

MASS READINGS

June 10, 2019 (Readings on USCCB website)

COLLECT PRAYER

O God, Father of mercies, whose Only Begotten Son, as he hung upon the Cross, chose the Blessed Virgin Mary, his Mother, to be our Mother also, grant, we pray, that with her loving help your Church may be more fruitful day by day and, exulting in the holiness of her children, may draw to her embrace all the families of the peoples. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


O God, from whom all good things come, grant that we, who call on you in our need, may at your prompting discern what is right, and by your guidance do it. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

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Old Calendar: St. Landericus

Pope Francis has decreed that the ancient devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, under the title of Mother of the Church, be inserted into the Roman Calendar.

The liturgical celebration, B. Mariæ Virginis, Ecclesiæ Matris, will be celebrated annually as a Memorial on the day after Pentecost.

St. Landericus was the Bishop of Paris from 650 to his death. He is best remembered as the founder of the first hospital in Paris.

According to the 1962 Missal of St. John XXIII the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, today is the feast of St. Margaret of Scotland. In the Ordinary Rite her feast is celebrated on November 16.


Mary, Mother of the Church
By issuing the Decree on the celebration of the feast of Mary, Mother of the Church, Pope Francis wishes to promote this devotion in order to “encourage the growth of the maternal sense of the Church in the pastors, religious and faithful, as well as a growth of genuine Marian piety”.

The decree reflects on the history of Marian theology in the Church’s liturgical tradition and the writings of the Church Fathers.

It says Saint Augustine and Pope Saint Leo the Great both reflected on the Virgin Mary’s importance in the mystery of Christ.

“In fact the former [St. Augustine] says that Mary is the mother of the members of Christ, because with charity she cooperated in the rebirth of the faithful into the Church, while the latter [St. Leo the Great] says that the birth of the Head is also the birth of the body, thus indicating that Mary is at once Mother of Christ, the Son of God, and mother of the members of his Mystical Body, which is the Church.”

The decree says these reflections are a result of the “divine motherhood of Mary and from her intimate union in the work of the Redeemer”.

Scripture, the decree says, depicts Mary at the foot of the Cross (cf. Jn 19:25). There she became the Mother of the Church when she “accepted her Son’s testament of love and welcomed all people in the person of the beloved disciple as sons and daughters to be reborn unto life eternal.”

In 1964, the decree says, Pope Paul VI “declared the Blessed Virgin Mary as ‘Mother of the Church, that is to say of all Christian people, the faithful as well as the pastors, who call her the most loving Mother’ and established that ‘the Mother of God should be further honoured and invoked by the entire Christian people by this tenderest of titles’”.


St. Landericus
St. Landericus was a sincere and dedicated servant of God who, like his Lord Jesus Christ, had great love for the poor and the lowly. He became bishop of Paris in 650 A.D., in the Frankish kingdom (formally Gaul) during the reign of Clovis II and served as bishop until 656 A.D. (some records show until his death in 661).

He was a very earnest and devout man, and distinguished especially by his great love of the poor and by his charity during the famine of 651 A.D. To relieve them, during a time of famine he sold not only his personal possessions but also some of the vessels and furniture of the church.

He became increasingly aware that the sick and poor of disease were not really cared for by the custom then in vogue of housing them in little hotels dependent on the casual aims of charitable persons. For this, it was attributed to him was the foundation of the city's first real hospital, dedicated to St. Christopher, erected near Notre-Dame on the site of the dwelling place of Erchinoaldus, mayor of the palace In time, this became the famous Hotel-Dieu.

He was also responsible for the Benedictines' setup of the Abbey of Denis and in 653 AD, he signed along with 23 other bishops the foundation charter granted by King Clovis to the Abbey. He was buried in the church of Saint-Germain-des-Pres, then called Saint Vincent's, where his relics, except two bones given to the parish of Saint Landry in 1408, are kept in a silver shrine. He is honored with an office in the new Paris Breviary. There is a statue of St. Landry, behind the altar of the Church of St. Landry in Opelousas, Louisiana. It appears to be that of a bishop, holding or distributing some bread or food. His feast day is June 10th.