nihil nisi

By Diogenes ( articles ) | Oct 15, 2006

The Boston Globe, whose investigative reporters copped a Pulitzer Prize for their aggressive treatment of priests who molested young people, offered a front-page farewell to the late Congressman Gerry Studds:

Gerry E. Studds, who championed environmental, maritime, and fisheries issues during 24 years in the US House of Representatives and lent an eloquent voice to health and human rights matters, died early yesterday.

Outside of the maritime industry, Rep. Studds was known to the American public primarily as the lawmaker censured by his colleagues in 1983, after his sexual affair with a teenage Congressional page came to light.

Rep. Studds did not resign in disgrace. He ran for re-election, and the voters of Massachusetts sent him back to Washington in 1984, and 1986, and 1988, and 1990, and 1992, and 1994-- always to applause from the Globe.

At about the same time, the Archbishop of Boston was continuing to hand out parish assignments to priests who were known to have molested teenagers. The Globe thinks that's terrible. Actually so do I. But one of us isn't being consistent.

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  • Posted by: Gil125 - Sep. 28, 2010 10:07 PM ET USA

    As the father of daughters, I have to find it passing strange that a parent would arrange to videotape an assignation, and apparently do so---without interfering with the act. I'm not sure who's sicker here, the Rev. Father or the father.

  • Posted by: garedawg - Sep. 28, 2010 8:18 PM ET USA

    If she's 18 years old, she's no longer a child. At that point, some of the responsibility rests with the young woman.