We have $160,514 to go in our Fall Campaign. Every penny is used to strengthen the Church. See details!
Click here to advertise on CatholicCulture.org

otr dashback: 5-15-04 -- bishops in the eyes of bishops

By Diogenes (bio - articles ) | Mar 30, 2008

Msgr. Ronald Knox's brother Wilfred (himself an Anglican priest) once proposed a Christian ethics in two volumes, the first volume to be titled Respect for the Clergy, the second, simply, Other Virtues.

Knox's tongue-in-cheek proposal showed, in a characteristically English way, how lightly he wore his own clerical dignity; but the joke took for granted a background of genial good will toward ecclesiastics, against which their foibles could be the occasion for amusement. That background is gone.

What changed? Not, in the first instance, the attitude of the laity toward the clergy, but rather the attitude of clergy toward themselves. Having ceased to demand honor of one another, they slid downward into the class of shady, parasitic professions that survive by means of glibness and a disregard for middle-class proprieties.

The scale of the collapse of personal honor came home to me recently in reading about a revolution in the opposite direction in another profession. The Duke of Wellington came to power at a time when the officer corps of the British army was venal, incompetent, slothful, and generally corrupt. As historian John Keegan shows, Wellington's reform of the officer corps began not by showering it with new dignities but by demanding moral probity and taking pains to see it enforced:

Hearing after the siege of Ciudad Rodrigo that many [wounded troops] had been left without shelter, he rode thirty miles after dinner to expel some uncaring officers from their lodging and install some wounded in their place. He made the same journey the following night to ensure that his orders had been obeyed, since they had been received 'in a sulky manner', and when he found they had not, he put the officers under arrest, marched them to headquarters and had them tried and cashiered.

In a generation and a half, a new military culture was in place. Officers enforced among themselves a higher moral standard than even their superiors required of them, and an unspoken code of honor made most official discipline superfluous. Moral disgrace was ended not by a press conference but a pistol.

Like the military, the clergy has its peaks and troughs. There was a time when it was conceivable that a bishop would tell the truth -- even to his own disadvantage, and even when an opportune lie would be undetectable. Today a "scrupulous bishop" seems a near-comic contradiction in terms. Because the laity has turned against them? No, but because bishops hold their own vocation in contempt.

In an honor-driven institution, sudden and unexplained disappearances are a fact of life. You remark on an empty seat at the table and you're told with a grim smile, "Captain So-and-So will no longer be favoring us with his presence." The message is clear: we acted, before others had a chance to. In a corrupt institution, almost no vice merits dismissal, and the indignation of the corps is trained on fault-finders. The brotherhood operates not to rebuke its own malefactors, but to appeal to outsiders for amnesty. A honorable institution insists on integrity. A corrupt one pleads for "healing."

From time to time Off The Record bloggers treat impenitent clerics in terms comparable to ... say, to officers who displace wounded soldiers in order to make themselves comfortable. The bishops, bless 'em, are our teachers in this matter. We may hope that reform will come, and that in a generation or so a renewed sense of honor will prevail. In the meantime, we'll be obliged to concentrate on Other Virtues.

An appeal from our founder, Dr. Jeffrey Mirus:

Dear reader: If you found the information on this page helpful in your pursuit of a better Catholic life, please support our work with a donation. Your donation will help us reach seven million Truth-seeking readers worldwide this year. Thank you!

Our Fall Campaign
Progress toward our year-end goal ($160,514 to go):
$200,000.00 $39,485.72
80% 20%
Sound Off! CatholicCulture.org supporters weigh in.

All comments are moderated. To lighten our editing burden, only current donors are allowed to Sound Off. If you are a donor, log in to see the comment form; otherwise please support our work, and Sound Off!

Show 2 Comments? (Hidden)Hide Comments
  • Posted by: - Apr. 01, 2008 2:33 PM ET USA

    I regret to inform you that honor is an outmoded patriarchal construct that has been removed from the male leaders of the People of God, so that they may better serve and understand the People, and be sensitized to their needs. What we need is a deeper understanding of the Sacred Feminine. And, um, Healing.

  • Posted by: - Mar. 30, 2008 8:18 PM ET USA

    I must translate this one!

Fall Campaign
Subscribe for free
Shop Amazon
Click here to advertise on CatholicCulture.org

Recent Catholic Commentary

Links: Think like a poet, academia's black sheep, Marion Cotillard on feminism 15 hours ago
Adapting Christianity? 15 hours ago
The Synod's choice: change the marketing campaign or change the product? 19 hours ago
The Synod Continues October 9
Why Pope Francis cannot win on sexual abuse October 9

Top Catholic News

Most Important Stories of the Last 30 Days
In Cuba, Pope emphasizes service to the vulnerable, praises thaw in US-Cuban relations CWN - September 21
Pope challenges America in speech to US Congress CWN - September 24
As Synod opens, Pope calls on Church to defend ‘unity and indissolubility’ of marriage bond CWN - October 5