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Christians in Sudan are 'de facto illegals,' bishop reports

July 11, 2014

Christians living in Sudan are “de facto illegals,” who cannot hold passports and , according to Bishop Eduard Hiiboro Kussala of Tambura-Yambio, a diocese in the newly independent country of South Sudan.

The bishop told Aid to the Church in Need that in Sudan, “priests have already been expelled; and the bishops are condemned to remain silent.” Bishop Kussala said that although the country’s constitution in theory guarantees freedom of worship for the estimated 3 million Christians living in Sudan, in practice they are second-class citizens.

The plight of Christians in Sudan was finally brought to worldwide notice by the story of Miriam Ibrahim, who was jailed and threatened with execution for refusing to renounce her Christian faith. Ibrahim is now living in the US embassy in Khartoum, unable to leave the country legally.


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