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More Catholic schools embrace classical curriculum

Catholic World News - September 12, 2012

Amid nationwide closures of Catholic schools, “a number of schools, private and even diocesan … are finding growth and enthusiasm in the rediscovery of a rigorous, classical liberal arts curriculum,” write Andrew Seeley and Elisabeth Ryan Sullivan of the Institute for Catholic Liberal Education.

“The last 15 years have seen an explosion of classical schools and homeschooling organizations among non-Catholic Christians,” they add. “Although not yet so well organized, many independent Catholic schools also have embraced the classical approach.”

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  • Posted by: Defender - Sep. 13, 2012 11:25 PM ET USA

    Having taught in three Catholic schools now, in none of them were the classics ever taught, mentioned or considered. Instead, books thought to be germane to today (the titles of which will be forgotten tomorrow) were used. This is so much different to how many of us were raised, the titles of which many of today's kids will apparently never know.

  • Posted by: unum - Sep. 12, 2012 9:10 PM ET USA

    The elitist comments offered along with the article are un-Christian. I was educated in a classical parish school in a poor neighborhood which was attended by the very poor as well as the children of the well to do. The well to do carried the majority of the financial burden of the school. But, at our class reunions, I am still amazed at the number of the "poor" who made it into the professions and business leadership. I wonder how they would have done without that parish school.

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