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Pope speaks on St. Albert the Great, unity of faith and science

March 24, 2010

At this public audience on Wednesday, March 24, Pope Benedict XVI spoke on the influence of St. Albert the Great, "one of the greatest masters of scholastic theology," whose work demonstrated that "there is no opposition between faith and science."

Born in Germany at the start of the 13th century, St. Albert the Great became a Dominican and taught at Paris and Cologne, where his most famous pupil was St. Thomas Aquinas. It was St. Albert who "opened the door to the complete acceptance of the thought of Aristotle into the philosophy and theology of the Middle Ages," thus paving the way for St. Thomas, the Pope observed. At the time, many Christian thinkers feared the influence of pagan thought, but St. Albert made the persuasive argument that "anything that is truly reasonable is compatible with faith as revealed in Sacred Scripture."


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