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Pope reflects on Christ feeding the multitude

August 04, 2014

During his Sunday Angelus address in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis reflected on the Gospel from the Mass of the day (Mt. 14:13-21) and said that the passage offers “three messages”: compassion, sharing, and the Eucharist.

Jesus reacted to the hungry crowd with compassion, the Pope said, and thus “teaches us to put the needs of the poor ahead of our own. Our needs, even if legitimate, will never be so urgent as those of the poor, who lack the necessities of life.”

Contrasting the words of the disciples, who asked that the crowds be sent away, with Christ’s words, Pope Francis noted “two different reactions, which reflect two opposing logics: the disciples are thinking according to the world, for which everyone has to take care of himself; Jesus thinks according to the logic of God, which is that of sharing.”

The multiplication of the loaves and fishes, the Pope continued, is a foreshadowing of “the Last Supper, when He will establish the perpetual memorial of His redeeming sacrifice.” The Pope concluded by invoking “the Virgin Mary, Mother of Divine Providence, to accompany us on this journey” of compassion, sharing, and the Eucharist.

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  • Posted by: John J Plick - Aug. 04, 2014 6:10 PM ET USA

    "The multiplication of the loaves and fishes, the Pope continued, is a foreshadowing of “the Last Supper, when He will establish the perpetual memorial of His redeeming sacrifice.” This foundational principle of the New Covenant, so glibly referenced by so many & so often..., is rarely integrated & connected with "real life" & it is a tragedy..., It would seem that only "the Canonized" of whom our present Pope may be one, are able to make the bridge to the "everyday..."