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Brazilian bishops join protests of government spending on World Cup

June 06, 2014

The Catholic bishops of Brazil have protested the government’s spending on the World Cup soccer tournament, saying that the costs illustrate an “inversion of priorities” when public funds for education and health projects are scarce.

The Catholic bishops’ conference is distributing brochures urging government leaders to allow public protests against the costs of the soccer tournament. The brochure is printed in red, imitating the red cards that soccer referees hand out to penalize players for flagrant misconduct.


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  • Posted by: bruno.cicconi7491 - Jun. 07, 2014 8:33 AM ET USA

    The Bishops Commission "Tourism Department" produced this brochure. Frankly, when Pope Francis talks of a "NGO Church", I think of Brazilian Bishops.

  • Posted by: geoffreysmith1 - Jun. 07, 2014 7:35 AM ET USA

    As an English Catholic and a football fan, I will be boycotting this World Cup and refusing to watch any matches, in protest against the obscene expense of holding the tournament. With millions of Brazilians living in the most intolerable poverty, they need bread, not circuses, and the bishops must be commended for opposing this dissolute profligacy by the Brazilian government.

  • Posted by: ElizabethD - Jun. 06, 2014 4:56 PM ET USA

    No sorry that was £11 billion for the World Cup (I was looking at an article from the UK), which is quite a lot more than $11 billion.

  • Posted by: ElizabethD - Jun. 06, 2014 4:51 PM ET USA

    I looked up what did World Youth Day in Rio cost and what is the World Cup costing... WYD cost $140 million of which only a portion paid by Brazil, and this was protested to be too much considering serious needs in the country where many are impoverished. In contrast, the World Cup is said to entail $11 billion in public spending.