We earn 8% in referral fees when you shop Amazon through our link. We make it easy! Click to learn how.
Click here to advertise on CatholicCulture.org

Jailed Vatican cleric says corrupt superiors approved financial transfers

Catholic World News - July 26, 2013

A Vatican official who faces money-laundering charges has appealed to Pope Francis, proclaiming his innocence and charging that he was betrayed by his superiors.

Msgr. Nunzio Scarano wrote to the Pontiff from Rome’s Regina Caeli prison, where he is detained on charges of planning to bring €20 million in cash into Italy illegally. He was arrested on that charge in June, after already having been suspended from his post at the Administration of the Patrimony of the Apostolic See (APSA) because he was being investigated on separate money-laundering charges.

"I never laundered dirty money, I never stole,” the accused cleric insisted in a latter to the Holy Father. “I tried to help someone who asked for help." Msgr. Scarano asserted that he has enough documentation to prove his innocence. He said that his financial deals always had the approval of his superiors.

More dramatically, the Italian priest charged that while working as an accountant in APSA—the office that handles the Vatican’s financial and real-estate assets— he had sought to curb financial misconduct by his own lay superiors in that office. His efforts were thwarted, he claims, because certain cardinals were “blackmailed” and covered up the abuses.

Msgr. Scarano said that he had brought the financial misconduct to the attention of Cardinal Stanislaw Dziwisz, who was secretary to Pope John Paul II and is now Archbishop of Krakow. He also said that he had contacted Cardinal Angelo Sodano, the dean of the College of Cardinals and former Secretary of State. Neither prelate helped him, he said.

The dramatic charges by Msgr. Scarano are likely to stir up new questions about corruption in the handling of Vatican business affairs—questions that were brought to the fore by the “Vatileaks” scandal. The accused cleric, who has admitted his involvement in some questionable financial transfers, apparently hopes to ensure that he will not face scrutiny alone.

Additional sources for this story
Some links will take you to other sites, in a new window.

An appeal from our founder, Dr. Jeffrey Mirus:

Dear reader: If you found the information on this page helpful in your pursuit of a better Catholic life, please support our work with a donation. Your donation will help us reach seven million Truth-seeking readers worldwide this year. Thank you!

Progress toward our March expenses ($28,832 to go):
$35,000.00 $6,167.70
82% 18%
Sound Off! CatholicCulture.org supporters weigh in.

All comments are moderated. To lighten our editing burden, only current donors are allowed to Sound Off. If you are a donor, log in to see the comment form; otherwise please support our work, and Sound Off!

Show 1 Comments? (Hidden)Hide Comments
  • Posted by: GymK - Jul. 26, 2013 7:21 PM ET USA

    Nor should he "face scrutiny alone." Everyone involved should be rooted out and accept the blame; laymen, priests, Bishops and even Cardinals if they are guilty of any crimes.

Subscribe for free
Click here to advertise on CatholicCulture.org
Shop Amazon

Recent Catholic Commentary

To talk of many things 0 hours ago
The stumbling block of morality on Self-Deprecation Day 1 hours ago
Opening Ourselves to Meaning and Purpose 21 hours ago
A thin-skinned Vatican spokesman harms his own standing 21 hours ago
Pope Francis prevails in Round I of battle for Vatican reform March 5

Top Catholic News

Most Important Stories of the Last 30 Days
Pope Francis to address Congress in joint session in September CWN - February 5