Action Alert!
Catholic World News

Quebec court rejects Catholic school's religious-freedom plea

December 10, 2012

An appeals court in Quebec has ruled that a Catholic school is legally obliged to offer a state-sponsored ethics course that conflicts with the teachings of the Church.

The Quebec court’s ruling, reversing the decision of a lower court, rejects a plea from Loyola High School. The school, a Jesuit institution located in Montreal, had taken its case to court after the education minister refused to allow the school to substitute its own ethics course, taught from a Catholic perspective, for the government’s curriculum.

Loyola High School is now weighing an appeal to the Canadian Supreme Court.


Sound Off! supporters weigh in.

All comments are moderated. To lighten our editing burden, only current donors are allowed to Sound Off. If you are a donor, log in to see the comment form; otherwise please support our work, and Sound Off!

Show 1 Comments? (Hidden)Hide Comments
  • Posted by: frjpharrington3912 - Dec. 10, 2012 11:53 PM ET USA

    Having served as a principal and a teacher at more than one Catholic school I can say from experience that a large majority of the parents of the students in those schools enrolled their children because they wanted them to be taught religious faith and morals from the perspective of the Catholic Church. Marie Bourque is right, "the responsibility belongs to parents to teach morals and religion" which is supported by articles 18 and 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of the UN.