Our Boosters are matching gifts up to $45,000. We have $32,467 to go. Your gift today will count twice!
Click here to advertise on CatholicCulture.org

The Passion trailer online

By Domenico Bettinelli, Jr. (articles ) | Jul 16, 2003

For those interested in getting a sneak peek at Mel Gibson's new movie about the Passion of Jesus can find online here.

If the whole movie is as moving as these few scenes are, it will be a blockbuster. I'm looking forward to seeing it now more than ever.

An appeal from our founder, Dr. Jeffrey Mirus:

Dear reader: If you found the information on this page helpful in your pursuit of a better Catholic life, please support our work with a donation. Your donation will help us reach seven million Truth-seeking readers worldwide this year. Thank you!

Our Fall Campaign
Progress toward our year-end goal ($117,141 to go):
$150,000.00 $32,858.98
78% 22%
Sound Off! CatholicCulture.org supporters weigh in.

All comments are moderated. To lighten our editing burden, only current donors are allowed to Sound Off. If you are a donor, log in to see the comment form; otherwise please support our work, and Sound Off!

Show 8 Comments? (Hidden)Hide Comments
  • Posted by: - Jul. 25, 2003 12:47 AM ET USA

    I have looked at the film again and I agree the figure is likely to be Satan. One correction to my earlier observations: when the figure appears in the crowd, it is clearly a man's face, not a woman's -- although the features seem to be "asexual" or "bisexual" -- perhaps a metaphor for Evil.

  • Posted by: - Jul. 24, 2003 8:28 PM ET USA

    <> A fascinating conjecture which makes sense within the limited context of the film "trailer" -- thank you. Certainly neither Our Lady nor Mary Magdalene really fit, and the character is shown both times in conjunction with the serpent. I have not read Anne Catherine Emmerich's work. CWN Reader

  • Posted by: - Jul. 20, 2003 4:45 PM ET USA

    I think the character filmed in the blue-black light is Satan. And very effective, too. The script is supposed to closely follow Mary Catherine Emmerich's book "The Dolorous Passion." If you have not read it, I would highly recommend it! This film is going to change hearts - for whoever is courageous enough to watch it.

  • Posted by: - Jul. 19, 2003 3:57 PM ET USA

    Like Jerome Kavaney, I would like to know how to contact Mr. Gibson to thank him for this film. I am confused by some scenes as I thought that the film was taken literally from Sacred Scripture. Who is the woman filmed with a blue back-light? Eve? St. Mary Magdelene? And what is happening in a sequence at the end of the trailer where a foot -- man's? woman's? comes down on a snake? Is this supposed to represent Mary, who is neither the preceding nor the following character? Thanks.

  • Posted by: - Jul. 17, 2003 8:39 PM ET USA

    How can one reach Mel Gibson to thank him for this film??? Jerome Kavaney jkavaney@cuttingedge.net

  • Posted by: - Jul. 16, 2003 9:37 PM ET USA

    There has been SO much talk about the anti-semitic message in this film. I daresay once the critics have actually viewed it they may change their minds.

  • Posted by: - Jul. 16, 2003 8:37 PM ET USA

    The trailer brought me to tears!

  • Posted by: - Jul. 16, 2003 8:13 PM ET USA

    i'm looking forward to the release of this film.

Fall 2014 Campaign
Subscribe for free
Shop Amazon
Click here to advertise on CatholicCulture.org

Recent Catholic Commentary

Contentious Spirits, Beware! 1 hours ago
And here's another very old story: the secular media don't understand Catholic affairs October 29
How not to be persuasive October 29
Francis the Man, Francis the Pope October 28
Clarifying what it might mean for a pope to wish to change Catholic doctrine October 28

Top Catholic News

Most Important Stories of the Last 30 Days
Key synod report calls for 'gradualism' in Church response to irregular family situations CWN - October 13
As synod concludes, bishops issue message, approve document; Pope weighs in CWN - October 20
Synod of Bishops opens with Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica CWN - October 6