Action Alert!


By Diogenes (articles ) | Feb 01, 2008

Father Richard John Neuhaus of First Things has charged CWN editor Phil Lawler with committing synecdoche, and since makes the accusation twice in the course of a short online review of Phil's new book, it can't be ignored.

But after a quick trip to the dictionary I'm confident that Phil won't be terribly upset. Especially when Father Neuhaus-- having said that the book will get further treatment in the print version of First Things, and made a few critical remarks in passing-- concludes his treatment this way:

Those and other caveats aside, The Faithful Departed is the best book-length treatment of the sex abuse crisis, its origins and larger implications, published to date.

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  • Posted by: - Feb. 01, 2008 5:28 PM ET USA

    Whether by suggstion,association, or substitution a comparison is made the repitition of this issue has become monotonous. Boston as a representational microcosm of the Church's errors is to some extent accurate; but, the invasion of modernism and relativism and outright paganism in to Catholic parishes is more than somewhat to blame. Phil's book is on target.

  • Posted by: - Feb. 01, 2008 12:02 PM ET USA

    Well. If you read Kenneth Burke on synecdoche, then saying it twice is a compliment.

  • Posted by: - Feb. 01, 2008 11:35 AM ET USA

    As if Phil Lawler and the rest of us wouldn't know what synecdoche means…  About the charge of the blackmailing of bishops, it may have happened in isolated cases, but there's no reason to believe in applies to the situation with Boston and Cardinal Law. I think larger issues there was a failure truly to hate the sin of the abuse of children out of a failure to love the victim as any true father would — as well as to love the perpetrator and try to prevent his committing this abmoniable evil.